Picutres of China National Silk Museum

Costume of the Sui Dynasty and Tang Dynasties (581-907): the Sui and Tang Dynasties are the most brilliant chapters in the history of ancient Chinese costume. The Tang Dynasty absorbed exotic fashions from the traders who piled the Silk Road. Of great influence was 'Hufu', a style of dress characterized by narrow sleeves and long trousers, which before long replaced traditional Chinese robes. Chinese costume, especially women's wear, attained an unprecedented elegance at the time

China's National Silk Museum is the first specializing in silk, aiming to show the history and development of Chinese silk during the past 5,000 years. It is located on the south shore of  West Lake, consisting of eight exhibition halls and housing exhibits from the Neolithic Age to the Qing Dynasty. Attraction Intro: China National Silk Museum
  • Costume of the Sui Dynasty and Tang Dynasties (581-907): the Sui and Tang Dynasties are the most brilliant chapters in the history of ancient Chinese costume. The Tang Dynasty absorbed exotic fashions from the traders who piled the Silk Road. Of great influence was 'Hufu', a style of dress characterized by narrow sleeves and long trousers, which before long replaced traditional Chinese robes. Chinese costume, especially women's wear, attained an unprecedented elegance at the time
  • Painted Brick (replica) of the Jin Dynasty (265-420): During the Wei and Jin Dynasties, Silk was produced in northwest China. Mulberry trees were cultivated intensively in the regions of present-day Gansu and Xinjiang. The painting shows the gathering of mulberry leaves by members of non-Han Chinese ethnic groups who lived in the Gansu Corridor
  • Double-weave Silk: The warp in double weave silk is composed of two series of ends, each interlacing with its own weft and forming a structure with two layers. The patterns on the front and back sides are the same, but the colors are different. Double-weave textiles made of wool appeared around the 3rd century AD. The technique was applied to silk in the Tang Dynasty. It became popular again in the Ming and Qing Dynasties.
  • Brocaded damask with dragons (replica), Wanli Period (1573-1620) of the Ming Dynasty: A remarkable 18.95 meters in length, this unique brocade damask was designed in such a way that it could be cut and sewn to produce an imperial robe, without further alterations.
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